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Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines 1.14

Installing and configuring OpenShift Pipelines

Red Hat OpenShift Documentation Team

Abstract

This document provides information about installing and configuring OpenShift Pipelines.

Chapter 1. Installing OpenShift Pipelines

This guide walks cluster administrators through the process of installing the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator to an OpenShift Container Platform cluster.

Prerequisites

  • You have access to an OpenShift Container Platform cluster using an account with cluster-admin permissions.
  • You have installed oc CLI.
  • You have installed OpenShift Pipelines (tkn) CLI on your local system.
  • Your cluster has the Marketplace capability enabled or the Red Hat Operator catalog source configured manually.
Note

In a cluster with both Windows and Linux nodes, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines can run on only Linux nodes.

1.1. Installing the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator in web console

You can install Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines using the Operator listed in the OpenShift Container Platform OperatorHub. When you install the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator, the custom resources (CRs) required for the pipelines configuration are automatically installed along with the Operator.

The default Operator custom resource definition (CRD) config.operator.tekton.dev is now replaced by tektonconfigs.operator.tekton.dev. In addition, the Operator provides the following additional CRDs to individually manage OpenShift Pipelines components: tektonpipelines.operator.tekton.dev, tektontriggers.operator.tekton.dev and tektonaddons.operator.tekton.dev.

If you have OpenShift Pipelines already installed on your cluster, the existing installation is seamlessly upgraded. The Operator will replace the instance of config.operator.tekton.dev on your cluster with an instance of tektonconfigs.operator.tekton.dev and additional objects of the other CRDs as necessary.

Warning

If you manually changed your existing installation, such as, changing the target namespace in the config.operator.tekton.dev CRD instance by making changes to the resource name - cluster field, then the upgrade path is not smooth. In such cases, the recommended workflow is to uninstall your installation and reinstall the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator.

The Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator now provides the option to choose the components that you want to install by specifying profiles as part of the TektonConfig custom resource (CR). The TektonConfig CR is automatically installed when the Operator is installed. The supported profiles are:

  • Lite: This installs only Tekton Pipelines.
  • Basic: This installs Tekton Pipelines, Tekton Triggers, and Tekton Chains.
  • All: This is the default profile used when the TektonConfig CR is installed. This profile installs all of the Tekton components, including Tekton Pipelines, Tekton Triggers, Tekton Chains, Pipelines as Code, and Tekton Addons. Tekton Addons includes the ClusterTasks, ClusterTriggerBindings, ConsoleCLIDownload, ConsoleQuickStart, and ConsoleYAMLSample resources.

Procedure

  1. In the Administrator perspective of the web console, navigate to OperatorsOperatorHub.
  2. Use the Filter by keyword box to search for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator in the catalog. Click the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator tile.
  3. Read the brief description about the Operator on the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator page. Click Install.
  4. On the Install Operator page:

    1. Select All namespaces on the cluster (default) for the Installation Mode. This mode installs the Operator in the default openshift-operators namespace, which enables the Operator to watch and be made available to all namespaces in the cluster.
    2. Select Automatic for the Approval Strategy. This ensures that the future upgrades to the Operator are handled automatically by the Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM). If you select the Manual approval strategy, OLM creates an update request. As a cluster administrator, you must then manually approve the OLM update request to update the Operator to the new version.
    3. Select an Update Channel.

      • The latest channel enables installation of the most recent stable version of the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator. Currently, it is the default channel for installing the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator.
      • To install a specific version of the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator, cluster administrators can use the corresponding pipelines-<version> channel. For example, to install the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator version 1.8.x, you can use the pipelines-1.8 channel.

        Note

        Starting with OpenShift Container Platform 4.11, the preview and stable channels for installing and upgrading the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator are not available. However, in OpenShift Container Platform 4.10 and earlier versions, you can use the preview and stable channels for installing and upgrading the Operator.

  5. Click Install. You will see the Operator listed on the Installed Operators page.

    Note

    The Operator is installed automatically into the openshift-operators namespace.

  6. Verify that the Status is set to Succeeded Up to date to confirm successful installation of Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator.

    Warning

    The success status may show as Succeeded Up to date even if installation of other components is in-progress. Therefore, it is important to verify the installation manually in the terminal.

  7. Verify that all components of the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator were installed successfully. Login to the cluster on the terminal, and run the following command:

    $ oc get tektonconfig config

    Example output

    NAME     VERSION   READY   REASON
    config   1.14.0     True

    If the READY condition is True, the Operator and its components have been installed successfully.

    Additonally, check the components' versions by running the following command:

    $ oc get tektonpipeline,tektontrigger,tektonchain,tektonaddon,pac

    Example output

    NAME                                          VERSION   READY   REASON
    tektonpipeline.operator.tekton.dev/pipeline   v0.47.0   True
    
    NAME                                        VERSION   READY   REASON
    tektontrigger.operator.tekton.dev/trigger   v0.23.1   True
    
    NAME                                    VERSION   READY   REASON
    tektonchain.operator.tekton.dev/chain   v0.16.0   True
    
    NAME                                    VERSION   READY   REASON
    tektonaddon.operator.tekton.dev/addon   1.11.0     True
    
    NAME                                                             VERSION   READY   REASON
    openshiftpipelinesascode.operator.tekton.dev/pipelines-as-code   v0.19.0   True

1.2. Installing the OpenShift Pipelines Operator using the CLI

You can install Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator from the OperatorHub using the CLI.

Procedure

  1. Create a Subscription object YAML file to subscribe a namespace to the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator, for example, sub.yaml:

    Example Subscription

    apiVersion: operators.coreos.com/v1alpha1
    kind: Subscription
    metadata:
      name: openshift-pipelines-operator
      namespace: openshift-operators
    spec:
      channel:  <channel name> 1
      name: openshift-pipelines-operator-rh 2
      source: redhat-operators 3
      sourceNamespace: openshift-marketplace 4

    1
    The channel name of the Operator. The pipelines-<version> channel is the default channel. For example, the default channel for Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator version 1.7 is pipelines-1.7. The latest channel enables installation of the most recent stable version of the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator.
    2
    Name of the Operator to subscribe to.
    3
    Name of the CatalogSource that provides the Operator.
    4
    Namespace of the CatalogSource. Use openshift-marketplace for the default OperatorHub CatalogSources.
  2. Create the Subscription object:

    $ oc apply -f sub.yaml

    The subscription installs the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator into the openshift-operators namespace. The Operator automatically installs OpenShift Pipelines into the default openshift-pipelines target namespace.

1.3. Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator in a restricted environment

The Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator enables support for installation of pipelines in a restricted network environment.

The Operator installs a proxy webhook that sets the proxy environment variables in the containers of the pod created by tekton-controllers based on the cluster proxy object. It also sets the proxy environment variables in the TektonPipelines, TektonTriggers, Controllers, Webhooks, and Operator Proxy Webhook resources.

By default, the proxy webhook is disabled for the openshift-pipelines namespace. To disable it for any other namespace, you can add the operator.tekton.dev/disable-proxy: true label to the namespace object.

1.4. Additional resources

Chapter 2. Uninstalling OpenShift Pipelines

Cluster administrators can uninstall the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator by performing the following steps:

  1. Delete the Custom Resources (CRs) that were added by default when you installed the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator.
  2. Delete the CRs of the optional components such as Tekton Hub that depend on the Operator.

    Caution

    If you uninstall the Operator without removing the CRs of optional components, you cannot remove them later.

  3. Uninstall the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator.

Uninstalling only the Operator will not remove the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines components created by default when the Operator is installed.

2.1. Deleting the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines components and Custom Resources

Delete the Custom Resources (CRs) created by default during installation of the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator.

Procedure

  1. In the Administrator perspective of the web console, navigate to AdministrationCustom Resource Definition.
  2. Type config.operator.tekton.dev in the Filter by name box to search for the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator CRs.
  3. Click CRD Config to see the Custom Resource Definition Details page.
  4. Click the Actions drop-down menu and select Delete Custom Resource Definition.

    Note

    Deleting the CRs will delete the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines components, and all the tasks and pipelines on the cluster will be lost.

  5. Click Delete to confirm the deletion of the CRs.
Important

Repeat the procedure to find and remove CRs of optional components such as Tekton Hub before uninstalling the Operator. If you uninstall the Operator without removing the CRs of optional components, you cannot remove them later.

2.2. Uninstalling the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator

You can uninstall the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator by using the Administrator perspective in the web console.

Procedure

  1. From the OperatorsOperatorHub page, use the Filter by keyword box to search for the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator.
  2. Click the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator tile. The Operator tile indicates that the Operator is installed.
  3. In the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator description page, click Uninstall.
Warning

When you uninstall the {pipeline-shortname} Operator, all resources within the target namespace where the Operator is installed, the openshift-pipelines namespace by default, are lost including the secrets you configured with it.

Additional resources

Chapter 3. Customizing configurations in the TektonConfig custom resource

In Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines, you can customize the following configurations by using the TektonConfig custom resource (CR):

  • Optimizing OpenShift Pipelines performance, including high-availability mode for the OpenShift Pipelines controller
  • Configuring the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines control plane
  • Changing the default service account
  • Disabling the service monitor
  • Configuring pipeline resolvers
  • Disabling cluster tasks and pipeline templates
  • Disabling the integration of Tekton Hub
  • Disabling the automatic creation of RBAC resources
  • Pruning of task runs and pipeline runs

3.1. Prerequisites

  • You have installed the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator.

3.2. Performance tuning using TektonConfig CR

You can modify the fields under the .spec.pipeline.performance parameter in the TektonConfig custom resource (CR) to change high availability (HA) support and performance configuration for the OpenShift Pipelines controller.

Example TektonConfig performance fields

apiVersion: operator.tekton.dev/v1alpha1
kind: TektonConfig
metadata:
  name: config
spec:
  pipeline:
    performance:
      disable-ha: false
      buckets: 7
      replicas: 5
      threads-per-controller: 2
      kube-api-qps: 5.0
      kube-api-burst: 10

All fields are optional. If you set them, the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator includes most of the fields as arguments in the openshift-pipelines-controller deployment under the openshift-pipelines-controller container. The OpenShift Pipelines Operator also updates the buckets field in the config-leader-election configuration map under the openshift-pipelines namespace.

If you do not specify the values, the OpenShift Pipelines Operator does not update those fields and applies the default values for the OpenShift Pipelines controller.

Note

If you modify or remove any of the performance fields, the OpenShift Pipelines Operator updates the openshift-pipelines-controller deployment and the config-leader-election configuration map (if the buckets field changed) and re-creates openshift-pipelines-controller pods.

High-availability (HA) mode applies to the OpenShift Pipelines controller, which creates and starts pods based on pipeline run and task run definitions. Without HA mode, a single pod executes these operations, potentially creating significant delays under a high load.

In HA mode, OpenShift Pipelines uses several pods (replicas) to execute these operations. Initially, OpenShift Pipelines assigns every controller operation into a bucket. Each replica picks operations from one or more buckets. If two replicas could pick the same operation at the same time, the controller internally determines a leader that executes this operation.

HA mode does not affect execution of task runs after the pods are created.

Table 3.1. Modifiable fields for tuning OpenShift Pipelines performance
NameDescriptionDefault value for the OpenShift Pipelines controller

disable-ha

Enable or disable the high availability (HA) mode. By default, the HA mode is enabled.

false

buckets

In HA mode, the number of buckets used to process controller operations. The maximum value is 10

1

replicas

In HA mode, the number of pods created to process controller operations. Set this value to the same or lower number than the buckets value.

1

threads-per-controller

The number of threads (workers) to use when the work queue of the OpenShift Pipelines controller is processed.

2

kube-api-qps

The maximum queries per second (QPS) to the cluster master from the REST client.

5.0

kube-api-burst

The maximum burst for a throttle.

10

Note

The OpenShift Pipelines Operator does not control the number of replicas of the OpenShift Pipelines controller. The replicas setting of the deployment determines the number of replicas. For example, to change the number of replicas to 3, enter the following command:

$ oc --namespace openshift-pipelines scale deployment openshift-pipelines-controller --replicas=3
Important

The kube-api-qps and kube-api-burst fields are multiplied by 2 in the OpenShift Pipelines controller. For example, if the kube-api-qps and kube-api-burst values are 10, the actual QPS and burst values become 20.

3.3. Configuring the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines control plane

You can customize the OpenShift Pipelines control plane by editing the configuration fields in the TektonConfig custom resource (CR). The Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator automatically adds the configuration fields with their default values so that you can use the OpenShift Pipelines control plane.

Procedure

  1. In the Administrator perspective of the web console, navigate to AdministrationCustomResourceDefinitions.
  2. Use the Search by name box to search for the tektonconfigs.operator.tekton.dev custom resource definition (CRD). Click TektonConfig to see the CRD details page.
  3. Click the Instances tab.
  4. Click the config instance to see the TektonConfig CR details.
  5. Click the YAML tab.
  6. Edit the TektonConfig YAML file based on your requirements.

    Example of TektonConfig CR with default values

    apiVersion: operator.tekton.dev/v1alpha1
    kind: TektonConfig
    metadata:
      name: config
    spec:
      pipeline:
        running-in-environment-with-injected-sidecars: true
        metrics.taskrun.duration-type: histogram
        metrics.pipelinerun.duration-type: histogram
        await-sidecar-readiness: true
        params:
          - name: enableMetrics
            value: 'true'
        default-service-account: pipeline
        require-git-ssh-secret-known-hosts: false
        enable-tekton-oci-bundles: false
        metrics.taskrun.level: task
        metrics.pipelinerun.level: pipeline
        enable-api-fields: stable
        enable-provenance-in-status: false
        enable-custom-tasks: true
        disable-creds-init: false
        disable-affinity-assistant: true

3.3.1. Modifiable fields with default values

The following list includes all modifiable fields with their default values in the TektonConfig CR:

  • running-in-environment-with-injected-sidecars (default: true): Set this field to false if pipelines run in a cluster that does not use injected sidecars, such as Istio. Setting it to false decreases the time a pipeline takes for a task run to start.

    Note

    For clusters that use injected sidecars, setting this field to false can lead to an unexpected behavior.

  • await-sidecar-readiness (default: true): Set this field to false to stop OpenShift Pipelines from waiting for TaskRun sidecar containers to run before it begins to operate. This allows tasks to be run in environments that do not support the downwardAPI volume type.
  • default-service-account (default: pipeline): This field contains the default service account name to use for the TaskRun and PipelineRun resources, if none is specified.
  • require-git-ssh-secret-known-hosts (default: false): Setting this field to true requires that any Git SSH secret must include the known_hosts field.

    • For more information about configuring Git SSH secrets, see Configuring SSH authentication for Git in the Additional resources section.
  • enable-tekton-oci-bundles (default: false): Set this field to true to enable the use of an experimental alpha feature named Tekton OCI bundle.
  • enable-api-fields (default: stable): Setting this field determines which features are enabled. Acceptable value is stable, beta, or alpha.

    Note

    Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines does not support the alpha value.

  • enable-provenance-in-status (default: false): Set this field to true to enable populating the provenance field in TaskRun and PipelineRun statuses. The provenance field contains metadata about resources used in the task run and pipeline run, such as the source from where a remote task or pipeline definition was fetched.
  • enable-custom-tasks (default: true): Set this field to false to disable the use of custom tasks in pipelines.
  • disable-creds-init (default: false): Set this field to true to prevent OpenShift Pipelines from scanning attached service accounts and injecting any credentials into your steps.
  • disable-affinity-assistant (default: true): Set this field to false to enable affinity assistant for each TaskRun resource sharing a persistent volume claim workspace.

Metrics options

You can modify the default values of the following metrics fields in the TektonConfig CR:

  • metrics.taskrun.duration-type and metrics.pipelinerun.duration-type (default: histogram): Setting these fields determines the duration type for a task or pipeline run. Acceptable value is gauge or histogram.
  • metrics.taskrun.level (default: task): This field determines the level of the task run metrics. Acceptable value is taskrun, task, or namespace.
  • metrics.pipelinerun.level (default: pipeline): This field determines the level of the pipeline run metrics. Acceptable value is pipelinerun, pipeline, or namespace.

3.3.2. Optional configuration fields

The following fields do not have a default value, and are considered only if you configure them. By default, the Operator does not add and configure these fields in the TektonConfig custom resource (CR).

  • default-timeout-minutes: This field sets the default timeout for the TaskRun and PipelineRun resources, if none is specified when creating them. If a task run or pipeline run takes more time than the set number of minutes for its execution, then the task run or pipeline run is timed out and cancelled. For example, default-timeout-minutes: 60 sets 60 minutes as default.
  • default-managed-by-label-value: This field contains the default value given to the app.kubernetes.io/managed-by label that is applied to all TaskRun pods, if none is specified. For example, default-managed-by-label-value: tekton-pipelines.
  • default-pod-template: This field sets the default TaskRun and PipelineRun pod templates, if none is specified.
  • default-cloud-events-sink: This field sets the default CloudEvents sink that is used for the TaskRun and PipelineRun resources, if none is specified.
  • default-task-run-workspace-binding: This field contains the default workspace configuration for the workspaces that a Task resource declares, but a TaskRun resource does not explicitly declare.
  • default-affinity-assistant-pod-template: This field sets the default PipelineRun pod template that is used for affinity assistant pods, if none is specified.
  • default-max-matrix-combinations-count: This field contains the default maximum number of combinations generated from a matrix, if none is specified.

3.4. Changing the default service account for OpenShift Pipelines

You can change the default service account for OpenShift Pipelines by editing the default-service-account field in the .spec.pipeline and .spec.trigger specifications. The default service account name is pipeline.

Example

apiVersion: operator.tekton.dev/v1alpha1
kind: TektonConfig
metadata:
  name: config
spec:
  pipeline:
    default-service-account: pipeline
  trigger:
    default-service-account: pipeline
    enable-api-fields: stable

3.5. Disabling the service monitor

You can disable the service monitor, which is part of OpenShift Pipelines, to expose the telemetry data. To disable the service monitor, set the enableMetrics parameter to false in the .spec.pipeline specification of the TektonConfig custom resource (CR):

Example

apiVersion: operator.tekton.dev/v1alpha1
kind: TektonConfig
metadata:
  name: config
spec:
  pipeline:
    params:
       - name: enableMetrics
         value: 'false'

3.6. Configuring pipeline resolvers

You can configure pipeline resolvers in the TektonConfig custom resource (CR). You can enable or disable these pipeline resolvers:

  • enable-bundles-resolver
  • enable-cluster-resolver
  • enable-git-resolver
  • enable-hub-resolver

Example

apiVersion: operator.tekton.dev/v1alpha1
kind: TektonConfig
metadata:
  name: config
spec:
  pipeline:
    enable-bundles-resolver: true
    enable-cluster-resolver: true
    enable-git-resolver: true
    enable-hub-resolver: true

You can also provide resolver specific configurations in the TektonConfig CR. For example, define the following fields in the map[string]string format to set configurations for each pipeline resolver:

Example

apiVersion: operator.tekton.dev/v1alpha1
kind: TektonConfig
metadata:
  name: config
spec:
  pipeline:
    bundles-resolver-config:
      default-service-account: pipelines
    cluster-resolver-config:
      default-namespace: test
    git-resolver-config:
      server-url: localhost.com
    hub-resolver-config:
      default-tekton-hub-catalog: tekton

3.7. Disabling cluster tasks and pipeline templates

By default, the TektonAddon custom resource (CR) installs clusterTasks and pipelineTemplates resources along with OpenShift Pipelines on the cluster.

You can disable installation of the clusterTasks and pipelineTemplates resources by setting the parameter value to false in the .spec.addon specification. In addition, you can disable the communityClusterTasks parameter.

Example

apiVersion: operator.tekton.dev/v1alpha1
kind: TektonConfig
metadata:
  name: config
spec:
  addon:
    params:
      - name: clusterTasks
        value: 'false'
      - name: pipelineTemplates
        value: 'false'
      - name: communityClusterTasks
        value: 'true'

3.8. Disabling the integration of Tekton Hub

You can disable the integration of Tekton Hub in the web console Developer perspective by setting the enable-devconsole-integration parameter to false in the TektonConfig custom resource (CR).

Example of disabling Tekton Hub

apiVersion: operator.tekton.dev/v1alpha1
kind: TektonConfig
metadata:
  name: config
spec:
  hub:
    params:
      - name: enable-devconsole-integration
        value: false

3.9. Disabling the automatic creation of RBAC resources

The default installation of the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator creates multiple role-based access control (RBAC) resources for all namespaces in the cluster, except the namespaces matching the ^(openshift|kube)-* regular expression pattern. Among these RBAC resources, the pipelines-scc-rolebinding security context constraint (SCC) role binding resource is a potential security issue, because the associated pipelines-scc SCC has the RunAsAny privilege.

To disable the automatic creation of cluster-wide RBAC resources after the Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines Operator is installed, cluster administrators can set the createRbacResource parameter to false in the cluster-level TektonConfig custom resource (CR).

Example TektonConfig CR

apiVersion: operator.tekton.dev/v1alpha1
kind: TektonConfig
metadata:
  name: config
spec:
  params:
  - name: createRbacResource
    value: "false"
...

Warning

As a cluster administrator or an user with appropriate privileges, when you disable the automatic creation of RBAC resources for all namespaces, the default ClusterTask resource does not work. For the ClusterTask resource to function, you must create the RBAC resources manually for each intended namespace.

3.10. Automatic pruning of task runs and pipeline runs

Stale TaskRun and PipelineRun objects and their executed instances occupy physical resources that can be used for active runs. For optimal utilization of these resources, Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines provides a pruner component that automatically removes unused objects and their instances in various namespaces.

Note

You can configure the pruner for your entire installation by using the TektonConfig custom resource and modify configuration for a namespace by using namespace annotations. However, you cannot selectively auto-prune an individual task run or pipeline run in a namespace.

3.10.1. Configuring the pruner

You can use the TektonConfig custom resource to configure periodic pruning of resources associated with pipeline runs and task runs.

The following example corresponds to the default configuration:

Example of the pruner configuration

apiVersion: operator.tekton.dev/v1alpha1
kind: TektonConfig
metadata:
  name: config
# ...
spec:
  pruner:
    resources:
      - taskrun
      - pipelinerun
    keep: 100
    prune-per-resource: false
    schedule: "* 8 * * *"
# ...

Table 3.2. Supported parameters for pruner configuration
ParameterDescription

schedule

The Cron schedule for running the pruner process. The default schedule runs the process at 08:00 every day. For more information about the Cron schedule syntax, see Cron schedule syntax in the Kubernetes documentation.

resources

The resource types to which the pruner applies. The available resource types are taskrun and pipelinerun

keep

The number of most recent resources of every type to keep.

prune-per-resource

If set to false, the value for the keep parameter denotes the total number of task runs or pipeline runs. For example, if keep is set to 100, then the pruner keeps 100 most recent task runs and 100 most recent pipeline runs and removes all other resources.

If set to true, the value for the keep parameter is calculated separately for pipeline runs referencing each pipeline and for task runs referencing each task. For example, if keep is set to 100, then the pruner keeps 100 most recent pipeline runs for Pipeline1, 100 most recent pipeline runs for Pipeline2, 100 most recent task runs for Task1, and so on, and removes all other resources.

keep-since

The maximum time for which to keep resources, in minutes. For example, to retain resources which were created not more than five days ago, set keep-since to 7200.

Note

The keep and keep-since parameters are mutually exclusive. Use only one of them in your configuration.

3.10.2. Annotations for automatically pruning task runs and pipeline runs

To modify the configuration for automatic pruning of task runs and pipeline runs in a namespace, you can set annotations in the namespace.

The following namespace annotations have the same meanings as the corresponding keys in the TektonConfig custom resource:

  • operator.tekton.dev/prune.schedule
  • operator.tekton.dev/prune.resources
  • operator.tekton.dev/prune.keep
  • operator.tekton.dev/prune.prune-per-resource
  • operator.tekton.dev/prune.keep-since
Note

The operator.tekton.dev/prune.resources annotation accepts a comma-separated list. To prune both task runs and pipeline runs, set this annotation to "taskrun, pipelinerun".

The following additional namespace annotations are available:

  • operator.tekton.dev/prune.skip: When set to true, the namespace for which the annotation is configured is not pruned.
  • operator.tekton.dev/prune.strategy: Set the value of this annotation to either keep or keep-since.

For example, the following annotations retain all task runs and pipeline runs created in the last five days and delete the older resources:

Example of auto-pruning annotations

kind: Namespace
apiVersion: v1
# ...
spec:
  annotations:
    operator.tekton.dev/prune.resources: "taskrun, pipelinerun"
    operator.tekton.dev/prune.keep-since: 7200
# ...

3.11. Additional resources

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