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Chapter 2. Comprehensive guide to getting started with Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS

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Note

If you are looking for a quickstart guide for ROSA, see Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS quickstart guide.

Follow this getting started document to create a Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS (ROSA) cluster, grant user access, deploy your first application, and learn how to revoke user access and delete your cluster.

You can create a ROSA cluster either with or without the AWS Security Token Service (STS). The procedures in this document enable you to create a cluster that uses AWS STS. For more information about using AWS STS with ROSA clusters, see Using the AWS Security Token Service.

2.1. Prerequisites

2.2. Setting up the environment

Before you create a Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS (ROSA) cluster, you must set up your environment by completing the following tasks:

  • Verify ROSA prerequisites against your AWS and Red Hat accounts.
  • Install and configure the required command line interface (CLI) tools.
  • Verify the configuration of the CLI tools.

You can follow the procedures in this section to complete these setup requirements.

2.2.1. Verifying ROSA prerequisites

Use the steps in this procedure to enable Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS (ROSA) in your AWS account.

Prerequisites

  • You have a Red Hat account.
  • You have an AWS account.

    Note

    Consider using a dedicated AWS account to run production clusters. If you are using AWS Organizations, you can use an AWS account within your organization or create a new one.

Procedure

  1. Sign in to the AWS Management Console.
  2. Navigate to the ROSA service.
  3. Click Get started.

    The Verify ROSA prerequisites page opens.

  4. Under ROSA enablement, ensure that a green check mark and You previously enabled ROSA are displayed.

    If not, follow these steps:

    1. Select the checkbox beside I agree to share my contact information with Red Hat.
    2. Click Enable ROSA.

      After a short wait, a green check mark and You enabled ROSA message are displayed.

  5. Under Service Quotas, ensure that a green check and Your quotas meet the requirements for ROSA are displayed.

    If you see Your quotas don’t meet the minimum requirements, take note of the quota type and the minimum listed in the error message. See Amazon’s documentation on requesting a quota increase for guidance. It may take several hours for Amazon to approve your quota request.

  6. Under ELB service-linked role, ensure that a green check mark and AWSServiceRoleForElasticLoadBalancing already exists are displayed.
  7. Click Continue to Red Hat.

    The Get started with Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS (ROSA) page opens in a new tab. You have already completed Step 1 on this page, and can now continue with Step 2.

2.2.2. Installing and configuring the required CLI tools

Use the following steps to install and configure AWS, Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS (ROSA), and OpenShift CLI tools on your workstation.

Prerequisites

  • You have an AWS account.
  • You created a Red Hat account.

    Note

    You can create a Red Hat account by navigating to console.redhat.com and selecting Register for a Red Hat account.

Procedure

  1. Install and configure the latest AWS CLI (aws).

    1. Follow the AWS Command Line Interface documentation to install and configure the AWS CLI for your operating system.

      Specify your aws_access_key_id, aws_secret_access_key, and region in the .aws/credentials file. See AWS Configuration basics in the AWS documentation.

      Note

      You can optionally use the AWS_DEFAULT_REGION environment variable to set the default AWS region.

    2. Query the AWS API to verify if the AWS CLI is installed and configured correctly:

      $ aws sts get-caller-identity  --output text

      Example output

      <aws_account_id>    arn:aws:iam::<aws_account_id>:user/<username>  <aws_user_id>

  2. Install and configure the latest ROSA CLI (rosa).

    1. Download the latest version of the ROSA CLI for your operating system from the Downloads page on the Red Hat OpenShift Cluster Manager Hybrid Cloud Console.
    2. Extract the rosa binary file from the downloaded archive. The following example extracts the binary from a Linux tar archive:

      $ tar xvf rosa-linux.tar.gz
    3. Add rosa to your path. In the following example, the /usr/local/bin directory is included in the path of the user:

      $ sudo mv rosa /usr/local/bin/rosa
    4. Verify if the ROSA CLI is installed correctly by querying the rosa version:

      $ rosa version

      Example output

      1.2.15
      Your ROSA CLI is up to date.

    5. Optional: Enable tab completion for the ROSA CLI. With tab completion enabled, you can press the Tab key twice to automatically complete subcommands and receive command suggestions.

      rosa tab completion is available for different shell types. The following example enables persistent tab completion for Bash on a Linux host. The command generates a rosa tab completion configuration file for Bash and saves it to the /etc/bash_completion.d/ directory:

      # rosa completion bash > /etc/bash_completion.d/rosa

      You must open a new terminal to activate the configuration.

      Note

      For steps to configure rosa tab completion for different shell types, see the help menu by running rosa completion --help.

    6. Log in to your Red Hat account by using the ROSA CLI:

      $ rosa login

      Example output

      To login to your Red Hat account, get an offline access token at https://console.redhat.com/openshift/token/rosa
      ? Copy the token and paste it here:

      Go to the URL listed in the command output to obtain an offline access token. Specify the token at the CLI prompt to log in.

      Note

      You can subsequently specify the offline access token by using the --token="<offline_access_token>" argument when you run the rosa login command.

    7. Verify if you are logged in successfully and check your credentials:

      $ rosa whoami

      Example output

      AWS Account ID:               <aws_account_number>
      AWS Default Region:           us-east-1
      AWS ARN:                      arn:aws:iam::<aws_account_number>:user/<aws_user_name>
      OCM API:                      https://api.openshift.com
      OCM Account ID:               <red_hat_account_id>
      OCM Account Name:             Your Name
      OCM Account Username:         you@domain.com
      OCM Account Email:            you@domain.com
      OCM Organization ID:          <org_id>
      OCM Organization Name:        Your organization
      OCM Organization External ID: <external_org_id>

      Check that the information in the output is correct before proceeding.

  3. Install and configure the latest OpenShift CLI (oc).

    1. Use the ROSA CLI to download the latest version of the oc CLI:

      $ rosa download openshift-client
    2. Extract the oc binary file from the downloaded archive. The following example extracts the files from a Linux tar archive:

      $ tar xvf openshift-client-linux.tar.gz
    3. Add the oc binary to your path. In the following example, the /usr/local/bin directory is included in the path of the user:

      $ sudo mv oc /usr/local/bin/oc
    4. Verify if the oc CLI is installed correctly:

      $ rosa verify openshift-client

      Example output

      I: Verifying whether OpenShift command-line tool is available...
      I: Current OpenShift Client Version: 4.9.12

2.3. Creating a ROSA cluster with STS

Choose from one of the following methods to deploy a Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS (ROSA) cluster that uses the AWS Security Token Service (STS). In each scenario, you can deploy your cluster by using Red Hat OpenShift Cluster Manager or the ROSA CLI (rosa):

Additional resources

2.4. Creating a cluster administrator user for quick cluster access

Before configuring an identity provider, you can create a user with cluster-admin privileges for immediate access to your Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS (ROSA) cluster.

Note

The cluster administrator user is useful when you need quick access to a newly deployed cluster. However, consider configuring an identity provider and granting cluster administrator privileges to the identity provider users as required. For more information about setting up an identity provider for your ROSA cluster, see Configuring an identity provider and granting cluster access.

Prerequisites

  • You have an AWS account.
  • You installed and configured the latest Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS (ROSA) CLI, rosa, on your workstation.
  • You logged in to your Red Hat account using the ROSA CLI (rosa).
  • You created a ROSA cluster.

Procedure

  1. Create a cluster administrator user:

    $ rosa create admin --cluster=<cluster_name> 1
    1
    Replace <cluster_name> with the name of your cluster.

    Example output

    W: It is recommended to add an identity provider to login to this cluster. See 'rosa create idp --help' for more information.
    I: Admin account has been added to cluster '<cluster_name>'.
    I: Please securely store this generated password. If you lose this password you can delete and recreate the cluster admin user.
    I: To login, run the following command:
    
       oc login https://api.example-cluster.wxyz.p1.openshiftapps.com:6443 --username cluster-admin --password d7Rca-Ba4jy-YeXhs-WU42J
    
    I: It may take up to a minute for the account to become active.

    Note

    It might take approximately one minute for the cluster-admin user to become active.

  2. Log in to the cluster through the CLI:

    1. Run the command provided in the output of the preceding step to log in:

      $ oc login <api_url> --username cluster-admin --password <cluster_admin_password> 1
      1
      Replace <api_url> and <cluster_admin_password> with the API URL and cluster administrator password for your environment.
    2. Verify if you are logged in to the ROSA cluster as the cluster-admin user:

      $ oc whoami

      Example output

      cluster-admin

Additional resource

2.5. Configuring an identity provider and granting cluster access

Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS (ROSA) includes a built-in OAuth server. After your ROSA cluster is created, you must configure OAuth to use an identity provider. You can then add members to your configured identity provider to grant them access to your cluster.

You can also grant the identity provider users with cluster-admin or dedicated-admin privileges as required.

2.5.1. Configuring an identity provider

You can configure different identity provider types for your Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS (ROSA) cluster. Supported types include GitHub, GitHub Enterprise, GitLab, Google, LDAP, OpenID Connect and htpasswd identity providers.

Important

The htpasswd identity provider option is included only to enable the creation of a single, static administration user. htpasswd is not supported as a general-use identity provider for Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS.

The following procedure configures a GitHub identity provider as an example.

Prerequisites

  • You have an AWS account.
  • You installed and configured the latest Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS (ROSA) CLI, rosa, on your workstation.
  • You logged in to your Red Hat account using the ROSA CLI (rosa).
  • You created a ROSA cluster.
  • You have a GitHub user account.

Procedure

  1. Go to github.com and log in to your GitHub account.
  2. If you do not have an existing GitHub organization to use for identity provisioning for your ROSA cluster, create one. Follow the steps in the GitHub documentation.
  3. Configure a GitHub identity provider for your cluster that is restricted to the members of your GitHub organization.

    1. Configure an identity provider using the interactive mode:

      $ rosa create idp --cluster=<cluster_name> --interactive 1
      1
      Replace <cluster_name> with the name of your cluster.

      Example output

      I: Interactive mode enabled.
      Any optional fields can be left empty and a default will be selected.
      ? Type of identity provider: github
      ? Identity provider name: github-1
      ? Restrict to members of: organizations
      ? GitHub organizations: <github_org_name> 1
      ? To use GitHub as an identity provider, you must first register the application:
        - Open the following URL:
          https://github.com/organizations/<github_org_name>/settings/applications/new?oauth_application%5Bcallback_url%5D=https%3A%2F%2Foauth-openshift.apps.<cluster_name>/<random_string>.p1.openshiftapps.com%2Foauth2callback%2Fgithub-1&oauth_application%5Bname%5D=<cluster_name>&oauth_application%5Burl%5D=https%3A%2F%2Fconsole-openshift-console.apps.<cluster_name>/<random_string>.p1.openshiftapps.com
        - Click on 'Register application'
      ...

      1
      Replace <github_org_name> with the name of your GitHub organization.
    2. Follow the URL in the output and select Register application to register a new OAuth application in your GitHub organization. By registering the application, you enable the OAuth server that is built into ROSA to authenticate members of your GitHub organization into your cluster.

      Note

      The fields in the Register a new OAuth application GitHub form are automatically filled with the required values through the URL defined by the ROSA CLI.

    3. Use the information from your GitHub OAuth application page to populate the remaining rosa create idp interactive prompts.

      Continued example output

      ...
      ? Client ID: <github_client_id> 1
      ? Client Secret: [? for help] <github_client_secret> 2
      ? GitHub Enterprise Hostname (optional):
      ? Mapping method: claim 3
      I: Configuring IDP for cluster '<cluster_name>'
      I: Identity Provider 'github-1' has been created.
         It will take up to 1 minute for this configuration to be enabled.
         To add cluster administrators, see 'rosa grant user --help'.
         To login into the console, open https://console-openshift-console.apps.<cluster_name>.<random_string>.p1.openshiftapps.com and click on github-1.

      1
      Replace <github_client_id> with the client ID for your GitHub OAuth application.
      2
      Replace <github_client_secret> with a client secret for your GitHub OAuth application.
      3
      Specify claim as the mapping method.
      Note

      It might take approximately two minutes for the identity provider configuration to become active. If you have configured a cluster-admin user, you can watch the OAuth pods redeploy with the updated configuration by running oc get pods -n openshift-authentication --watch.

    4. Enter the following command to verify that the identity provider has been configured correctly:

      $ rosa list idps --cluster=<cluster_name>

      Example output

      NAME        TYPE      AUTH URL
      github-1    GitHub    https://oauth-openshift.apps.<cluster_name>.<random_string>.p1.openshiftapps.com/oauth2callback/github-1

Additional resource

2.5.2. Granting user access to a cluster

You can grant a user access to your Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS (ROSA) cluster by adding them to your configured identity provider.

You can configure different types of identity providers for your ROSA cluster. The following example procedure adds a user to a GitHub organization that is configured for identity provision to the cluster.

Prerequisites

  • You have an AWS account.
  • You installed and configured the latest Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS (ROSA) CLI, rosa, on your workstation.
  • You logged in to your Red Hat account using the ROSA CLI (rosa).
  • You created a ROSA cluster.
  • You have a GitHub user account.
  • You have configured a GitHub identity provider for your cluster.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to github.com and log in to your GitHub account.
  2. Invite users that require access to the ROSA cluster to your GitHub organization. Follow the steps in Inviting users to join your organization in the GitHub documentation.

2.5.3. Granting administrator privileges to a user

After you have added a user to your configured identity provider, you can grant the user cluster-admin or dedicated-admin privileges for your Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS (ROSA) cluster.

Prerequisites

  • You have an AWS account.
  • You installed and configured the latest Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS (ROSA) CLI, rosa, on your workstation.
  • You logged in to your Red Hat account using the ROSA CLI (rosa).
  • You created a ROSA cluster.
  • You have configured a GitHub identity provider for your cluster and added identity provider users.

Procedure

  • To configure cluster-admin privileges for an identity provider user:

    1. Grant the user cluster-admin privileges:

      $ rosa grant user cluster-admin --user=<idp_user_name> --cluster=<cluster_name> 1
      1
      Replace <idp_user_name> and <cluster_name> with the name of the identity provider user and your cluster name.

      Example output

      I: Granted role 'cluster-admins' to user '<idp_user_name>' on cluster '<cluster_name>'

    2. Verify if the user is listed as a member of the cluster-admins group:

      $ rosa list users --cluster=<cluster_name>

      Example output

      ID                 GROUPS
      <idp_user_name>    cluster-admins

  • To configure dedicated-admin privileges for an identity provider user:

    1. Grant the user dedicated-admin privileges:

      $ rosa grant user dedicated-admin --user=<idp_user_name> --cluster=<cluster_name>

      Example output

      I: Granted role 'dedicated-admins' to user '<idp_user_name>' on cluster '<cluster_name>'

    2. Verify if the user is listed as a member of the dedicated-admins group:

      $ rosa list users --cluster=<cluster_name>

      Example output

      ID                 GROUPS
      <idp_user_name>    dedicated-admins

2.6. Accessing a cluster through the web console

After you have created a cluster administrator user or added a user to your configured identity provider, you can log into your Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS (ROSA) cluster through the web console.

Prerequisites

  • You have an AWS account.
  • You installed and configured the latest Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS (ROSA) CLI, rosa, on your workstation.
  • You logged in to your Red Hat account using the ROSA CLI (rosa).
  • You created a ROSA cluster.
  • You have created a cluster administrator user or added your user account to the configured identity provider.

Procedure

  1. Obtain the console URL for your cluster:

    $ rosa describe cluster -c <cluster_name> | grep Console 1
    1
    Replace <cluster_name> with the name of your cluster.

    Example output

    Console URL:                https://console-openshift-console.apps.example-cluster.wxyz.p1.openshiftapps.com

  2. Go to the console URL in the output of the preceding step and log in.

    • If you created a cluster-admin user, log in by using the provided credentials.
    • If you configured an identity provider for your cluster, select the identity provider name in the Log in with…​ dialog and complete any authorization requests that are presented by your provider.

2.7. Deploying an application from the Developer Catalog

From the Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS web console, you can deploy a test application from the Developer Catalog and expose it with a route.

Prerequisites

  • You logged in to the Red Hat Hybrid Cloud Console.
  • You created a Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS cluster.
  • You configured an identity provider for your cluster.
  • You added your user account to the configured identity provider.

Procedure

  1. Go to the Clusters page in OpenShift Cluster Manager.
  2. Click the options icon (⋮) next to the cluster you want to view.
  3. Click Open console.
  4. Your cluster console opens in a new browser window. Log in to your Red Hat account with your configured identity provider credentials.
  5. In the Administrator perspective, select Home Projects Create Project.
  6. Enter a name for your project and optionally add a Display Name and Description.
  7. Click Create to create the project.
  8. Switch to the Developer perspective and select +Add. Verify that the selected Project is the one that you just created.
  9. In the Developer Catalog dialog, select All services.
  10. In the Developer Catalog page, select Languages JavaScript from the menu.
  11. Click Node.js, and then click Create to open the Create Source-to-Image application page.

    Note

    You might need to click Clear All Filters to display the Node.js option.

  12. In the Git section, click Try sample.
  13. Add a unique name in the Name field. The value will be used to name the associated resources.
  14. Confirm that Deployment and Create a route are selected.
  15. Click Create to deploy the application. It will take a few minutes for the pods to deploy.
  16. Optional: Check the status of the pods in the Topology pane by selecting your Node.js app and reviewing its sidebar. You must wait for the nodejs build to complete and for the nodejs pod to be in a Running state before continuing.
  17. When the deployment is complete, click the route URL for the application, which has a format similar to the following:

    https://nodejs-<project>.<cluster_name>.<hash>.<region>.openshiftapps.com/

    A new tab in your browser opens with a message similar to the following:

    Welcome to your Node.js application on OpenShift
  18. Optional: Delete the application and clean up the resources that you created:

    1. In the Administrator perspective, navigate to Home Projects.
    2. Click the action menu for your project and select Delete Project.

2.8. Revoking administrator privileges and user access

You can revoke cluster-admin or dedicated-admin privileges from a user by using the Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS (ROSA) CLI, rosa.

To revoke cluster access from a user, you must remove the user from your configured identity provider.

Follow the procedures in this section to revoke administrator privileges or cluster access from a user.

2.8.1. Revoking administrator privileges from a user

Follow the steps in this section to revoke cluster-admin or dedicated-admin privileges from a user.

Prerequisites

  • You installed and configured the latest Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS (ROSA) CLI, rosa, on your workstation.
  • You logged in to your Red Hat account using the ROSA CLI (rosa).
  • You created a ROSA cluster.
  • You have configured a GitHub identity provider for your cluster and added an identity provider user.
  • You granted cluster-admin or dedicated-admin privileges to a user.

Procedure

  • To revoke cluster-admin privileges from an identity provider user:

    1. Revoke the cluster-admin privilege:

      $ rosa revoke user cluster-admin --user=<idp_user_name> --cluster=<cluster_name> 1
      1
      Replace <idp_user_name> and <cluster_name> with the name of the identity provider user and your cluster name.

      Example output

      ? Are you sure you want to revoke role cluster-admins from user <idp_user_name> in cluster <cluster_name>? Yes
      I: Revoked role 'cluster-admins' from user '<idp_user_name>' on cluster '<cluster_name>'

    2. Verify that the user is not listed as a member of the cluster-admins group:

      $ rosa list users --cluster=<cluster_name>

      Example output

      W: There are no users configured for cluster '<cluster_name>'

  • To revoke dedicated-admin privileges from an identity provider user:

    1. Revoke the dedicated-admin privilege:

      $ rosa revoke user dedicated-admin --user=<idp_user_name> --cluster=<cluster_name>

      Example output

      ? Are you sure you want to revoke role dedicated-admins from user <idp_user_name> in cluster <cluster_name>? Yes
      I: Revoked role 'dedicated-admins' from user '<idp_user_name>' on cluster '<cluster_name>'

    2. Verify that the user is not listed as a member of the dedicated-admins group:

      $ rosa list users --cluster=<cluster_name>

      Example output

      W: There are no users configured for cluster '<cluster_name>'

2.8.2. Revoking user access to a cluster

You can revoke cluster access for an identity provider user by removing them from your configured identity provider.

You can configure different types of identity providers for your ROSA cluster. The following example procedure revokes cluster access for a member of a GitHub organization that is configured for identity provision to the cluster.

Prerequisites

  • You have a ROSA cluster.
  • You have a GitHub user account.
  • You have configured a GitHub identity provider for your cluster and added an identity provider user.

Procedure

  1. Navigate to github.com and log in to your GitHub account.
  2. Remove the user from your GitHub organization. Follow the steps in Removing a member from your organization in the GitHub documentation.

2.9. Deleting a ROSA cluster and the AWS STS resources

You can delete a ROSA cluster that uses the AWS Security Token Service (STS) by using the Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS (ROSA) CLI, rosa. You can also use the ROSA CLI to delete the AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) account-wide roles, the cluster-specific Operator roles, and the OpenID Connect (OIDC) provider. To delete the account-wide inline and Operator policies, you can use the AWS IAM Console.

Important

Account-wide IAM roles and policies might be used by other ROSA clusters in the same AWS account. You must only remove the resources if they are not required by other clusters.

Prerequisites

  • You installed and configured the latest Red Hat OpenShift Service on AWS (ROSA) CLI, rosa, on your workstation.
  • You logged in to your Red Hat account using the ROSA CLI (rosa).
  • You created a ROSA cluster.

Procedure

  1. Delete a cluster and watch the logs, replacing <cluster_name> with the name or ID of your cluster:

    $ rosa delete cluster --cluster=<cluster_name> --watch
    Important

    You must wait for the cluster deletion to complete before you remove the IAM roles, policies, and OIDC provider. The account-wide roles are required to delete the resources created by the installer. The cluster-specific Operator roles are required to clean-up the resources created by the OpenShift Operators. The Operators use the OIDC provider to authenticate.

  2. Delete the OIDC provider that the cluster Operators use to authenticate:

    $ rosa delete oidc-provider -c <cluster_id> --mode auto 1
    1
    Replace <cluster_id> with the ID of the cluster.
    Note

    You can use the -y option to automatically answer yes to the prompts.

  3. Delete the cluster-specific Operator IAM roles:

    $ rosa delete operator-roles -c <cluster_id> --mode auto 1
    1
    Replace <cluster_id> with the ID of the cluster.
  4. Delete the account-wide roles:

    Important

    Account-wide IAM roles and policies might be used by other ROSA clusters in the same AWS account. You must only remove the resources if they are not required by other clusters.

    $ rosa delete account-roles --prefix <prefix> --mode auto 1
    1
    You must include the --<prefix> argument. Replace <prefix> with the prefix of the account-wide roles to delete. If you did not specify a custom prefix when you created the account-wide roles, specify the default prefix, ManagedOpenShift.
  5. Delete the account-wide inline and Operator IAM policies that you created for ROSA deployments that use STS:

    1. Log in to the AWS IAM Console.
    2. Navigate to Access management Policies and select the checkbox for one of the account-wide policies.
    3. With the policy selected, click on Actions Delete to open the delete policy dialog.
    4. Enter the policy name to confirm the deletion and select Delete to delete the policy.
    5. Repeat this step to delete each of the account-wide inline and Operator policies for the cluster.

2.10. Next steps

2.11. Additional resources

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